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20121201
20121231
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want to thank my husband ray and our two children, bailey and houston -- they're 11 years old now, and so many of my colleagues that i -- that were here when i started bringing my children as babies here have watched them grow up. the senate isn't easy on families. they have sacrificed so i could serve the people of texas, and i'm grateful for their patience and generosity. they have loved coming to the capitol during these times. 11 years for the children and 20 for my husband ray. and i know my children's fondest memory, if i ask them what do i remember most about visits to the capitol, it is playing soccer in the russell building's hallways in the evenings when the coast is clear. and i would not be here todayf it were not for my parents who gave me the gifts of strong values, unwaivin unwavering supd the education to be whatever i wanted to be. i must say that my parents were surprised when they saw what i wanted to be. th would have never thought that the dauter, growing up in lamarck, texas, a town of 15,000 good people, would think that she could be a united states senator.
't have land use restrictions. housing prices in houston, which has no zoning, are higher today than they were in 2008. so we don't see the kind of decline when you don't have the land use restrictions. the restrictions are a because the bubbles and that on caused a financial crisis. host: our guest is randal o'toole. marshall is joining us some inglewood, florida, democratic line. - marsha.ood mornin caller: good morning. president obama is focused on we can do better. i do not hope that or dream that or wonder that. i believe that and i am not even worried. i wish people had less worry. thank you. guest: we have a variety of problems. i think most of our problems are institutional. i think people misperceive the problems. in the 1970's we had a big scare about urban sprawl gobbling up our farmlands. yet all the urban areas in the country only cover less than 3% of the land area of the united states. we have a billion acres of farmland and yet in 1985 the florida legislature passed a law that protect farmland from urban sprawl. that law ended up causing a huge housing bubble that ha
to the houston rodeo. i want her to see the texas altculture. i'm not sure if she knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo. suffice it to say, there were a lot of rhinestones and cowboy boots and day care and big cath. -- big hair and big hats. she said to me, if we were here on monday and went to the chamber of commerce --these people look like -- uch.i said, yeah, pretty m we want to make sure that our stay at home moms and dads and the same opportunity for security savings as those who work outside of the home have. it has been a huge success. we also cosponsored the national breast and cervical cancer early protection program. she is a skilled legislator and a dear friend. senator jay rockefeller has been outstanding chairman of the commerce committee. we do not always agree, but we have worked hard to reach consensus and we have gotten things done. the faa bill started the planning for the next generation of air traffic control. the highway bill, the nasa reauthorization that ensure that we would keep the focus on our space program has been instrumental in our national security and
're going to raise revenue going forward. host: our next caller comes from chris in houston, texas on our line for democrats. go ahead, chris. caller: hi. i'm just saying that payroll tax, we really don't get a tax relief because at the end of the year, we had to pay -- we get less back from the government on our income tax. and what the payroll tax does, it just gives us more money during the year. and one other thing. president bush had a surplus at the start of his term of being president. instead of giving that tax rate to the rich, he should have put that money into medicare. what kind of fool doesn't see the babyboomers coming into their health issues? host: joseph rosenberg. guest: so just as a point of clarification, so the payroll tax cut, it is not recaptured at the end of the year. so that is -- for the past two years, the tax rate has been reduced by 2% that has basically been trickled out in paychecks in the form of lower withholding throughout the year. but is not later recaptured at the end of the year with a higher tax. host: next up is mickey in kings port, tennessee, on
the country. i can tell you that it is not a question of texas and new york, it is houston and dallas. the difference between what people want, are willing to expect -- willing to except and think is appropriate, that is the essence of the issue here. if you look at the polls, when it comes to the budget, everyone wants the government to do what it is doing now but they want to pay less for it. a good track, if you can figure it out. host: joshua gordon is the policy director for the concorde. thank you for joining us this week. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> since that conversation, not much has changed. we expect the house and senate to be back in at 4:30 eastern. the senate is in recess subject to the call of the chair. right now they are meeting in the separate caucuses on capitol hill to discuss their potential resolutions to the fiscal cliff. we are hoping to hear from harry reid outside the ohio corridor. we will bring you those comments live in the next couple of minutes as the happen. ultimat
us from houston, texas, the democrats' line. caller: i would like to say that the assault rifle should be treated like the automobile -- you have to have a title to them and buy insurance and the higher the gun power is, the higher insurance, and when you sell it or do something with it, the title should be transferred and responsibility transferred to the person that owns it. in this way, we would have to go big organizations working, trying to come up with the right solution, the nra and the insurance industry. if you want to own something, you should be responsible for it. host: double for the call. from the new york times book section -- we are featuring the -- "the last line -- lion" interview this evening. gayle joins us from louisiana. democrats line. caller: independent line. host: it's as democrats, but go ahead. -- it says democrats, but go ahead. caller: on this assault weapons controversy, a couple of things -- what happened to those children was awful. what happened to those people from superstorm sandy was awful. when we bomb and destroy andple's homes and children
that occurred in houston, texas where a mother and her daughter were murdered on christmas eve and so there are times when the local authorities need immediate assistance, or the time then we had a child predator, although this legislation may not define violent acts as such, i can tell you that the community felt violated when a number of children were preyed upon and through the kind n and the understanding of the local f.b.i. office in houston and my persistence and the difficulty of coordinating with -- coordinating with local authorities because of the sort of uncomfortableness of the involvement of the federal government, we overcame that and they participated and shortly thereafter the predator was captured. children are impacted and that is why this legislation is enormously important. i also want to take note of the fact that the gentleman from south carolina is right. the f.b.i. did not have statutory authority to assist in the investigation, mass killings or other violent crime that occurred in other places such as schools and universities. we now have put forward this fede
chris in houston, texas on our line for democrats. go ahead, chris. caller: hi. i'm just saying that payroll tax, we really don't get a tax relief because at the end of the year, we had to pay -- we get less back from the government on our income tax. and what the payroll tax does, it just gives us more money during the year. and one other thing. president bush had a surplus at the start of his term of being president. instead of giving that tax rate to the rich, he should have put that money into medicare. what kind of fool doesn't see the babyboomers coming into their health issues? host: joseph rosenberg. guest: so just as a point of clarification, so the payroll tax cut, it is not recaptured at the end of the year. so that is -- for the past two years, the tax rate has been reduced by 2% that has basically been trickled out in paychecks in the form of lower withholding throughout the year. but is not later recaptured at the end of the year with a higher tax. host: next up is mickey in kings port, tennessee, on our line for independents. go ahead, mickey. caller: good morning
's a proud graduate of prairie view a&m university in texas, in the surrounding area of houston, prairie view, texas. he has a great heritage and connectedness to the black power movement, and he's a good combination of peace, gentleness, firmness, leadership and courage. and i might say that he was a man for these times. just as the bible dictated thattester was a woman for her -- that esther was a woman for her time. our chairman of the congressional black caucus found his role in a number of challenges that we faced. and if i might paraphrase a biblical story, hopefully i have it nearly right, but i call this chairman a modern day joseph, who was able to wear the multicolor coat, representing constituencies from different backgrounds and going to represent his people in a foreign land. chairman cleaver would go to places where others had not gone or raise his voice to issues that were unpopular and he did so with the consensus and collaboration of the astute and committed members of the congressional black caucus. i went to his district, as many of us did. we're proud to see the affection
terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports that at the end of march, murders in my city had spiked almost 60%. and as of june, homicides in chicago were up almost 20% over last year. 488 murders to date. ranging from 18 months to 19 years. these are americans also shot down like dogs in the street. as i recall being in the hospital room when my son was pronounced dead, there was a primal scream that came from his sister, his mother. it wasn't a scream of a black woman. it wasn't a scream of a white mother. it wasn't a scream of a latina mother mother or a scream of an asian mother. it was a scream, a primal scream of a mother. a scream that is rarely duplicated anywhere. it is a horrible scream and i can't get that scream out of my consciousness. so i applaud speaker pelosi, leader pelosi, soon to be speaker pelosi and i applaud the democrats who are standing here. we must stop future sandy hooks right now. we cannot allow the schools of america to become killing fields. w
their own restrictions. this is how it works in houston, which has no zoning. half of the residential neighborhoods have restrictions. if you live in a neighborhood without restrictions, you are allowed to petition neighbors, and if 75% agree, you can write covenants and restrictions for your neighborhood. if the developer says we think your neighborhood would be more valuable if we changed it, and we will pay you to change, you can vote to do that. that happens all the time. you get an evolutionary system that responds to demand, rather than government winds and fads. >> your thoughts about the federal housing administration, where nearly for 80 years, they have maintained a stable housing market, helping lower and middle-income families enter the housing market through government assistance. guest: that is true in places without wind use restrictions, the when you have something like the fha subsidizing housing prices, you're creating more instability. host: how do they subsidized it? guest: by providing lower interest rate loans than the private market might provide, which means to
. damian in houston, texas, independent caller. . caller: good morning. texas is a right to work state. right to work states tended to victimize the employees. is employers don't have what a level standards for employment and it tends to create a high turnover, a love of the discrimination in the workplace -- a lot of discrimination. people feel they are not secure in their job and they often end up leaving or are fired because they are required to do so much for so little and it tends to make one feel as though things fe fort going to be sav the long term. host: here's the "washington times showing a map of the states in green that have right to work laws. so that's the argument, companies will come to the states that have right-to-work. these are the top five states for a business and they also have right-to-work laws. caller: i see the statistics, but i think sometimes the statistics are manipulated in a way. although these states appeared to be productive, there's a lot of criteria involved that may not be evaluated. and sometimes, even in a system where there appears to be a very
's going. or houston the impact. it's just not in their thought process to think that they have a problem with unemployment or housing. detroit, columbus, other places have it. parts of massachusetts have it. other parts of massachusetts don't. so i think this has to be very localized and figure out how you solve that. so it's going to be tight until we get rules figured out and then you bring in private capital. but i'm not sure that's alltogether a bad thing but i think we have a lot more granular by-city or by-community to figure out what the answer should be. >> turning now to the customer relationship and how it's changing in response to the very dramatic developments in the bank and developments over the last several years so, first of all, i was delighted to hear about your efforts regarding home buyer -- over the past few years people need to understand what they are getting into when they make this enormous commitment but let me ask you about the change in the different potential change. it was reported a couple weeks ago in one news article that i saw that the bank was backing o
an update on the fiscal cliff, two articles to show you. this is from the houston chronicle. that's from the houston chronicle. if there are updates, we will get those throughout this morning's program. one other article and we want to show you -- according to one article, the nominee has flown back from hawaii with the president on air force one. most of the papers are filled with articles about the fiscal cliff issue. joining us now is merideth shiner of cq roll call. ms. shiner. guest: ms. shiner seem so formal. we're having a recession in between christmas and new year's. that has not happened since the 1970's. maybe we should play disco or maybe they should just finished their work so they can stop making terrible jokes. i think you are a point to see some push in the next few days to try to get some sort of small deal done. you have to remember and your viewers will notice, because they are fans of the legislative process, anything that gets done, it has to get done very quickly in order for there to be time before new year's for it to be approved and signed into law. today's the 2
in houston, which has no zoning, are higher today than they were in 2008. so we don't see the kind of decline when you don't have the land use restrictions. the restrictions are because the bubble and that caused a financial crisis. host: our guest is randal o'toole. marsha is joining us some inglewood, florida, democratic line. caller: good morning. president obama is focused on we can do better. i do not hope that or dream that or wonder that. i believe that and i am not even worried. i wish people had less worry. thank you. guest: we have a variety of problems. i think most of our problems are institutional. i think people misperceive the problems. in the 1970's we had a big scare about urban sprawl gobbling up our farmlands. yet all the urban areas in the country only cover less than 3% of the land area of the united states. we have a billion acres of farmland and yet in 1985 the florida legislature passed a law that protect farmland from urban sprawl. that law ended up causing a huge housing bubble that has not created a foreclosure crisis in florida. last year to repeal a bad law will h
not know what the toward is talking about. the population is going to. or houston -- it is not in their thought process to think they have a problem with unemployment or housing. other places have it. parts of massachusetts have it. i think this has to be very local to figure out how to solve it. i think the availability of credit is fine. i am not sure that is altogether a bad thing. i think we have a lot more granular to figure out what the right answer should be as opposed to try to figure out by community or state. >> can you talk about the customer relationship and how it changes to the dramatic really some chips with the bank over the last several years. your coverage regarding homebuyer education and the huge lessons of the past few years people need to understand what they're getting into when they make this enormous commitment. let me ask you about a different change in the customer relationship. it was reported a couple of weeks ago of in won a news article or the bank was backing off of a plan for imposing fees. i am curious, was it right? what should we
about. the population's going. or houston the impact. it's just not in their thought process to think that they have a problem with unemployment or housing. detroit, columbus, other places have it. parts of massachusetts have it. other parts of massachusetts don't. so i think this has to be very localized and figure out how you solve that. so it's going to be tight until we get rules figured out and then you bring in private capital. but i'm not sure that's all together a bad thing but i think we have a lot more granular by-city or by-community to figure out what the answer should be. >> turning now to the customer relationship and how it's changing in response to the very dramatic developments in the bank and developments over the last several years so, first of all, i was delighted to hear about your efforts regarding home buyer -- over the past few years people need to understand what they are getting into when they make this enormous commitment but let me ask you about the change in the different potential change. it was reported a couple weeks ago in one news article that i saw
this year, 675,000 vehicles a in inventory. houston, texas, this is eric. caller: i am if first-time caller. years or 22 years old. i have spent of this entire year try to educate myself a lot more on the whole -- let me get right to the point. i think it should be a state decision. the supreme court should allow the states to make the kind of a decision. giving more people -- in giving more power to the government to regulate this on a national level will create so many issues down the road, and it probably a lot of issues in the immediate -- the reason we even got to this. is because we get some much power to the government to regulate all of the different things and issues. giving them more power is just going to create more problems. my basic thought is, more government power, more issues. host: we will leave it there. victor on the republican line. caller: i do not think the supreme court should even hear the case on gay marriage. our country was built on marriage. it is an abomination to rid it should not even be brought up again to the supreme court. host: why not let them handle it
, houston, many parts of florida, atlanta, washington, d.c., they are in trouble. host: why are you going to do fine if we go off the fiscal cliff? caller: i live on the beach. i live a lifestyle where i cut my own fish, raise my own garden, hunt my own game, i do just fine. host code no sacrifice from you, then? all right. jerry, ohio, independent caller. go ahead. caller: they should let it go. let the bush tax breaks expire and go back to the clinton taxes. it will hurt people a little bit, but it will hurt the wealthy more. i believe that jobs will come back if we do that. host: what about automatic spending cuts? it is not just the defense department that gets cut. non-defense, education, health care, across the board getting cut? caller: it would probably only be cut for a short time. host: so, a sacrifice by letting tax rates go up? caller: right, they will start working together if they wind up going off the cliff. host: what do you think about addressing medicare spending? caller: the biggest thing the government has to do is all of the waste in everything. defense, medicare, eve
coming from twitter, weighing in on the question. john says -- host: joe, houston, texas, let me clarify. if you have more than one home at one time, you can write off the first, that you of and the others that you own, that is what john would like to see. joe, republican line. caller: like the other caller said, reduced from $1,000 to $500. host: do you benefit from that? caller: yes. host: you would still be willing to give it up? how come? caller: [indiscernible] i do not want to tax the rich. i make $150,000. i have to trucks, i have to employees, my taxes will go up. host: "the christian science monitor" had a survey with results around mortgage interest and charitable giving deductions. caller: [indiscernible] charity, christmas time, toys for tots. host: theresa, illinois, hello. caller: good morning. i would be willing to give up a little bit more. i was forced into early retirement. i lost my job in february of 2009. i cannot find anything. so, i was forced to go into early retirement, so i am giving my extra 500 that i would have earned every month. i believe that that is a giv
, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local news -- the chicago tribune reports that at the end of march, murders in my city had spiked almost 60%. and as of june, homicide in chicago were up almost 20% over last year. 488 murders to date. ranging from 18 months to 19 years. these are americans also shot down like dogs in the street. as i recall being in the hospital room when my son was pronounced dead, there was a primal scream that came from his sister, his mother. it wasn't a scream of a black woman. it wasn't a scream of a white mother. it wasn't a scream of a latina mother mother or a scream of an asian mother. it was a scream, a primal scream of a mother. a scream that is rarely duplicated anywhere. it is a horrible scream and i can't get that scream out of my consciousens. so i applaud speaker pelosi, leader pelosi, soon to be speaker pelosi and i applaud the democrats who are standing here. we must stop future sandy hooks right now. we cannot allow the schools of america to become killing fields. we must act now. i applaud all of those wh
and to your family, you did more than ok. to the asian american community in houston, texas, and texas, i want you to know this hero spoke volumes for what america is all about. that no matter where we come from, we can stand equally under the sun. he thought of that and his beloved hawaii, as his final words, not only in representing hawaii, aloha, but to america. we love you and goodbye. senator, we love you and goodbye. what a great champion, what a great warrior for peace and one who represented all of us so well. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, today the house will vote on the national defense authorization act for 2013. congratulations to house armed services committee chairman buck mckeon and committee staff direct
anywhere in this country. host: here is the minimum wage in california. mike in houston, republican. caller: good morning. i oppose raising the minimum wage. it's an artificial boundary. it does not represent a person's skills that. if a person is 17 and has no skills, why what they earn more than their producer? are the employers compelled to pay them $8 or $7 an hour and if they have no skills? that's why you have a higher unemployment rate among kids. when i was an intern in d.c., they did not pay me, but internship provide an opportunity to develop your skills, to find out what you like, to find out how you treat customers, and to find out what you are good at. your pay raise becomes effective depending on how you are. when you build up your skills and find out what you are good at and you produce. host: are your business owner? caller: i am not, but i'm in sales. my commission is built on mccleamy performance. host:. the texas minimum wage, $7.25. the cost of living in california speaks for itself. why regulate that? let the employer, let the student or a the normally young kids negoti
's not a question of texas versus new york. it's a question of houston versus dallas in terms of differences in what people want and what people are willing to accept. what people think is the appropriate course. even on the last couple of calls we've had someone say we've got to cut spending. someone else said we need more revenue. and if you look at the polls when it comes to the budget everybody wants the government to do just what it's doing now they just want to pay less for it. that's a good trick if you can figure it out. host: gentlemen, thanks so much for joining us this week. and all our information can be found on c-span's fiscal cliff website. up next we'll talk about the president's cabinet and who is in and who is out. and later it's been over a year since the last u.s. troops withdrew from iraq. the we'll ask michael gordon what the status of that country is today. >> a lot of people that i know looking back on the last 40 years will say that ever since apollo the space program has been a job program. how many jobs can we get in your district, in your state? the space shuttle passed b
victims of hurricane sandy. chuck schumer and houston to the brand talks about what it meant to residents of the state that swept through the region. their remarks are about 15 minutes. -- en ck schumer and kirstwe gillibrand. >> we are elated with the discussion, the allowing of amendments, and the strong support for a bill that would give much needed relief from the storm sandy. we are urging the house to put this bill on the floor quickly and allow a vote. we're asking speaker boehner to do just that, but the bill on the floor and allow a vote. just as it would be unconscionable for the house to leave without voting on fiscal cliff, it would be unconscionable as well for them to leave without voting on sandy. the strong bipartisan support we got 12 votes from the republicans turn to the fact that if the three democrats the could not be here were here, we would have had 64 on this bill and we still got more than 60 even with those three absences which shows how important this bill was, this gives an impetus to the bill and says to speaker boehner, you will have bipartisan support. pleas
. >> right. >> houston, dallas had been converted politically by people coming from elsewhere. the intermountain west. so if you halt that, you know, and when you're thinking about latinos as part of a coalition, the key element of that coalition was this mixture of newcomers. latino newcomers and newcomers from other places, particularly if you think to the future of some place like north carolina or georgia, even at congressional district level. so if you halt that, that's one thing. the other question is what do you -- >> or halt it permanently. >> well, no, but for how long? >> slow now. >> we're into a five-year lag, so when does it pick up? how long does it take to get back to the levels of migration that created this political environment, which was created 10 to 15 years ago. and, you know, by the time this latino electorate gets to voting age, you know, will they start voting early? always a question. >> right. >> not, you know, it varies from one cycle to another. very hard to tell. >> right. >> very difficult to understand what mobilizes people when they're young. >
know what you think about the fiscal cliff. we will talk to chris in houston. you are on c-span. caller: i wish boehner and the republicans -- i am a libertarian, but i take the side of the conservative republicans on the fiscal talks. i just wish that john boehner and mitch mcconnell would have some more backbone and the tables and say we heard. read about blaming republicans, and boehner said it on the senate floor, but they need to come to the podium today or tomorrow and say senator reid, we recently passed two bills are sitting on the fiscal cliff cristeta sitting on your desk and you have the audacity to blame republicans. i think they're both to blame someone. reid a little more so. we see what happens. obama has led this country. he is about to lead us into another debt downgrade. it should be evident to see what happens when you let partisan democrats like harry reid and nancy pelosi call the shots. >> marty, you are calling on the democrat line. what is your reaction? caller: the president needs to get the republicans come back in from christmas holiday. >> what do you think i
are not done with you yet. i went and did the audition for the houston grand opera and the offer me a contract right away. from that moment forward, everything changed. was that same moment of hearing that recording when everything changed down that moment of thinking that it was all over. my friends said to me during this silence, don't you miss singing? isn't it terrible for you? i would good concert tour sees all my colleagues and it would be hard. i was always fine. i say that with the utmost honesty. i always thought, if this is what i'm supposed to do, fortunately i come from this incredible group. i come from this incredible, strong lineage of incredible matriarchs, these women who does have to soldier on in spite of everything in my note mother had her work to cutout for her. >> she sounds like an early tiger mom. you guys have dinner ready on the table and one of the children would present oral reports. thursday's was music might when you would perform gospel and popular music was banned in the house. you said, she did not want her babies to be walking the streets. "she was terribly c
that are important and deserve members' support. for example, senator she houston's bill to obtain abortions in military hospitals in case of rape and incest rights a terrible wrong, but we must take great care. we have the tools to deal with those who would attack us. we do not need to surrender our liberty. because of this moment us challenge to the founding principles of the united states that no person may be deprived of liberty without due process of law, this bill should be rejected. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. mckeon: i yield, mr. speaker, two minutes to my friend and colleague, the vice chairman of the armed services committee and chairman of the subcommittee on emerging threats and capabilities, the gentleman from texas, mr. thornberry. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for two minutes. mr. thornberry: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the chairman, the ranking member and all the staff members for getting us here. unfortunately, it is all
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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